Hockey player saved by teammates after going into cardiac arrest during game

A 61-year-old man from South Carolina credits his teammates with saving his life after he recently suffered cardiac arrest in the middle of a hockey game. James Pitts is a member of the Trash Pandas team in North Charleston. He told WCIV that on March 13, his team worked together to take care of their own when their play came to a halt. said Pitts. “And Dave said, ‘man, you’ve been dead for about four or five minutes.'” Tom Donnelly is one of Pitts teammates and a CPR trainer. “Within 30 seconds the chest compressions started, which is the most important thing you can do,” Donnelly said. Pitts said the ice was the best place he could have been when this incident happened. is produced.” Luckily it all turned out fantastically – really lucky the stars aligned and it’s also lucky it happened at the rink which is just one exit away, about 2 miles from Trident Medical Center,” he said. Pitts’ advice to others is to learn CPR or how to operate an AED “because you can save someone’s life.” never stop playing hockey no matter what,” he said.

A 61-year-old man from South Carolina credits his teammates with saving his life after he recently suffered cardiac arrest in the middle of a hockey game.

James Pitts is a member of the Trash Pandas team in North Charleston. He said WCIV that on March 13, his team worked together to take care of his family when their match was called off.

“The first thing that came out of my mouth was, ‘what happened,’ you know?” said Pitts. “And Dave said, ‘Man, you’ve been dead for four or five minutes. “”

Tom Donnelly is one of Pitts teammates and a CPR trainer.

“Within 30 seconds the chest compressions started, which is the most important thing you can do,” Donnelly said.

Pitts said the ice was the best place he could have been when this incident happened.

“Fortunately it all worked out fantastically – really lucky the stars aligned and it’s also lucky it happened at the rink which is only one exit away, about 2 miles away from Trident Medical Center,” he said.

Pitts’ advice to others is to learn CPR or how to operate an AED “because you can save someone’s life.”

He returned to the ice about two weeks ago, but a fall forced him out for a few more weeks.

“I will never stop playing hockey no matter what,” he said.

Catherine J. Martinez