School teacher by day, professional hockey player by night

As the Premier Hockey Federation (PHF) playoffs draw closer, the Minnesota Whitecaps are trying to peak at the right time with players like Audra Morrison making a splash.

Morrison is third on the team in goals and total points this season. But when she’s not schooling her opponents, it’s inside the walls of a school that you’ll also find her students.

“(My students) are like, ‘What? There’s no way. You’re just a gym teacher,'” Morrison told FOX9. “Once they realize I’m a professional hockey player, they really get into it.”
Audra is also a physical education teacher at Randolph Heights Elementary School in St. Paul. The Whitecaps striker does her best to keep her pupils on their toes, as they do the same in return.

“My body is more tired when I’m playing hockey and my brain is more exhausted when I’m teaching,” Morrison said. “I will have to give up hockey eventually, but I won’t give up teaching.”

The connection to his school often goes beyond the gymnasium and hopping to the rink with the Whitecaps.

Students often watch her play in person at home games and virtually on the road. His biggest fans are also among his biggest detractors.

“Some of them will be like, ‘Oh, your team struggled this weekend,'” Morrison said with a smile. “So I’m like, ‘Thank you! Yeah!'”

As the Premier Hockey Federation (PHF) playoffs draw closer, the Minnesota Whitecaps are trying to get to the top at the right time with players like Audra Morrison making a splash – when she’s not teaching a lesson.

Leave it to the kids to keep it real with a real professional athlete – an athlete who proves to be an example for the next generation.

“I think it’s cool that they can look up to me and my teammates as role models,” Morrison said. “Especially the little girls at school.”

“We have a lot of kids looking up to him, but the little girls certainly look up to him,” Randolph Heights manager Tim Williams said.

But these same students can also serve as teachers.

“I learned to keep my passion,” Morrison said. “I see how excited these kids are and it makes me think I’m here for a reason.”

She’s also carrying on a legacy at the school – her father was the former physical education teacher at Randolph Heights, the position she currently holds.

Catherine J. Martinez